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Sharon Booth

I’m super excited today to welcome another member of the New Romantics Press to my blog. Following on from Lizzie Lamb’s lovely post, I’ve invited June Kearns to share her five photos with me, and she has responded magnificently. I’m a huge fan of June’s books – she even managed to convert me into reading about a cowboy, and did it so well that I’ve never forgotten the delicious Colt McCall! Here’s the lovely June to explain why she chose these five photographs.

Thank you so much Sharon, for the chance to take part in this blog. I’ve loved seeing other people’s special photos.

1. First picture is of my Grandad – the one with the laurel leaves round his neck. I think he’d won a bicycle race.

One of my earliest memories is of sitting on my grandfather’s knee under a thick blue cloud of pipe tobacco smoke, (home-grown…

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Sharon Booth

My guest today is the lovely Lizzie Lamb. Lizzie was the first author I ever got in touch with, and she very kindly answered my questions with great patience. Since then, I’ve been lucky enough to meet her in person, and discovered that she’s just as fabulous in real life as she is online, so it’s a great pleasure to welcome her to the blog today, so she can share with us her five photos. 

My Earliest Photo (just about)!

On the back it reads: Betty aged three, written in my mother’s hand. I lived with my mother, grandparents and two young uncles who teased me, stuck me up trees and then walked away, and thought it was hilarious to encourage me to stand on the dining room table and amuse visitors with a medley of Shirley Temple songs. When I was five, the Salvation Army came to our street…

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Put it in Writing

What a great story! This is one of my favourite reads of the year so far. It was one of those books where you want to get to the end to see how it all plays out, but you also don’t want it to end because you know you’re going to miss it.

From the back cover:

Jane Austen meets Zane Grey
The American West, 1867. After a stagecoach wreck, well-bred bookish spinster, Annie Haddon, (product of mustn’t-take-off-your-hat, mustn’t-take-off-your-gloves, mustn’t-get-hot-or-perspire Victorian society) is thrown into the company of cowboy, Colt McCall – a man who lives by his own rules and hates the English.
Can two people from such wildly different backgrounds learn to trust each other? Annie and McCall find out on their journey across the haunting , mystical landscape of the West.

My Review:

An Englishwoman’s Guide to the Cowboy is a romantic novel with a difference –…

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Linda's Book Bag

cowboy cover

Having been so honoured to win an award from the Romantic Novelists’ Association last year, I’m absolutely delighted to welcome one of their members, June Kearns, to Linda’s Book Bag to stay in with me today.

If you’re an author who’d also like to stay in with me to tell me about one of your books, please click here for more details.

Staying in with June Kearns

Welcome to Linda’s Book Bag June. Thanks so much for staying in with me. Tell me, which of your books have you brought along to share this evening and why have you chosen it?

Thank you so much for this lovely invitation, Linda!

Tonight, I’ve brought along my first novel: An Englishwoman’s Guide to the Cowboy  – which has recently had a real renaissance!

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Years ago, the first chapter won a national magazine competition and I still love the setting and characters. Here’s…

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Lost in a good book

My heart is pounding with excitement at the chance to interview the irresistible Colt McCall from June Kearn’s book.

CowboyWhat were your first impressions of Miss Annie Haddon?

First off? As if a scruffy dog had suddenly appeared and attached itself to me. Yeah, someone’s stray, a pampered pet – one that wasn’t particularly biddable, either. For such a small fry though, she seemed to have a pretty big mouth. A talker, too – mite too fond of her own opinions to my mind, at the time. No idea what she’d landed herself into, either. Not … a … single, solitary clue.

Annie called you intimidating and you certainly don’t suffer fools readily.  Would your life be easier if you were more diplomatic?

Let’s face it, shall we? Annie was white, English, opinionated. Not a hope in hell of understanding someone like me. As for diplomacy! Well, the West belongs…

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3 Sixty Five Blog

When I was exploring Moped fashion! a couple of weeks ago, I stumbled on this great Youtube film.

If you love all things Sixties, I’m sure you’ll enjoy this fantastic compilation.

Hope you’re having a good day.

You might also enjoy Some 70s dishes that may not have stood the test of time!

and The celebrity cook Fanny Cradock was born On This Day in 1909

Coming Soon: Leefdale by Michael Murray

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Behind the Willows

I wake up to the radio because I’m less likely to smash things that don’t beep at me in the morning which means that occasionally I wake up to the day’s news report.

Yesterday morning was one of those days. I went from soundly sleeping to hearing the news that Stephen Hawking had died.  Slightly stunned I was still half in dream world contemplating the loss of a renowned physicist who’s physical limitations had inspired so many while the radio man jabbered on.

It seems there was another newsworthy death in the world, Sheela, the local zoo’s 25 year old camel, had died.  I sleepy blinked at the ceiling befuddled by the juxtaposition of deaths.  I wondered at the oddness of the pairing of world famous scientist and author’s death with that of Sheela the camel, as well as wondering what an average camel life span is*, when the radio…

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